Home   |   Log In   |   Contact   |   About Us  |   Help  

Local Dive Shops

Scuba Lessons

Dive Charters

Dive Clubs

Travel & Lodging

Helpful Links
Dive Sites ID & Photo Gallery

 QuickSearch

 Dive Type:
All Dive Sites
Boat Dive
Shore Dive
Night Dive
Salt Water
Fresh Water

 Difficulty:
Any
Snorkling
Beginner
Intermediate
Advanced
Technical

 Attractions:
All
Caves/Mines
Ruins
Wrecks
Walls
Natural Reefs
Artificial Reefs
Fishing

    
    Submit a Site!
    Upload Photos!
    Glossary

 
Back  |  USA: Pacific Northwest   |  Puget Sound - South


China Wall  |  USA: Pacific Northwest

Google Map |  View Dive Maps |  View Gallery |  Upload Photos |  Leave Review
Blakely Rock
Bainbridge Island - Blakely Rock, WA

Type: Saltwater
Difficulty:
Advanced
Amenities: Public Mooring


Ratings (1-5):
Reviews: 6
Enjoyment: 4.67
Visibility: 4.83
Current: 1.67
Aquatic Life: 3.33

Photo Gallery:

Clown Nudibranch
Zoanthids - Epizoanthus scotinus
Blakely Rock
White Lined Dirona (AKA Frosted or Alabaster)
Monterey Sea Lemon
Frosted (Alabaster) Nudibranch
Female Kelp Greenling
Black-Eyed Goby
Female Kelp Greenling
Bait Ball



Features

Wall, Large Rock Formation / Pinnacle

Description

If the vis is good when you descend the anchor line at the buoy you will see that the main "wall" is actually an almost pyramid shaped rock embedded in the steep slope such that on one side is a tall face that runs from 60 to 100 feet deep, but you can swim all the way around the rock. The main rock is just west of the anchor line. There is a series of rocks and smaller walls extending from the east of the main rock towards Blakely rock. In fact, while at the surface take a look at Blakely rock, because all the bottom structure around the rock looks the same. At China wall there is not a lot of vegetation, but as you get closer to Blakely Rock (and shallower) you will encounter kelp and seaweed on the rocks. There is not a ton of life on the wall itself, but expect to see rockfish, lingcod, and several species of sculpin. If the vis is good then it is a great sight seeing dive anyway. There are cracks and fissures to explore in the wall and I imagine finding a Giant Pacific Octo would not be out of the question. You can end your dive in the shallow rock ledges and reefs surrounding Blakely rock where there is a ton of little critters such as sculpin, gunnels, war bonnets, etc.

Special Restrictions:

This site is an advanced dive due to the depths and potential current. You can dive this site off slack, as the rock creates an eddy from the currant, but donít venture east of Blakely rock if there is current of you could get swept out to the middle of the sound ( bad) if you are not comfortable with currents, then I would dive this close to slack, or on a small exchange. Also, make sure your anchor is secure if you are not using the buoy.

How to get there:

The site is easy to find. Use your marine chart to find Blakely Rock. It is about 5 miles west of the boat launch at Alki Point, west Seattle. It is off of the SE corner of Bainbridge Island. As you approach the rock, it is easy to see as it stands about 20 feet above the surface even at a high tide and has a navigational marker above it. You can approach safely from the south. There is a sand bar to the west, reefs to the east and northeast. You can approach from the north if you are careful and in a shallow draft boat. As you approach the rock, to the southwest of the rock (I seem to remember it is a couple hundred feet from the rock) you will see an orange marker buoy. It is provided and maintained by a local dive charter and is attached to a bombproof anchor. If it is in use, the cobble shore to the north of the rock provides OK holding, but check your anchor before leaving the area to dive. I would not recommend anchoring near the wall as the slope is steep and the currant could easily drag your anchor off the slope. (long swim!)


Thanks to Slobert for submitting this site!
  Comments Leave Review  
John R9/7/2009Rating: 4
We tied the boat up to the white float and followed the line down to the wall. On the South side we saw several sailfin sculpins and two warbonnets on the sandy bottom. The North side was swept with current but manageable. Near the East end a large vertical fissure in the rock was partialy occupied by a large sun star but lower in the crack was a very large GPO. It started to come out and greet us but hit the current and retreated. So did we. Great dive that we will do repeatedly.

ChevaYEA7/28/2008Rating: 4
We were on the South side of the rock in the eddy during a very large exchange. The rock blocked it perfectly for us to have a relaxing dive as long as we didn't venture too close to the points. When we did it was easy to pull back toward the center of the rock and find protection from the current. Visibility was great and there were seals everywhere.

SwimmerTodd11/3/2007Rating: 5
Beautiful dive site! What a kick to see the harbor seals swimming under water! They are so curious and come right up to you. The structures are beautiful and the fish are very large. A must dive if you have access to a boat.

Slobert11/7/2007Rating: 5
I have dove this site a couple of times in the last few weeks and really enjoy diving here. The structure is beautiful and the more you look the more you see. On this dive every little crack on the rock had a gunnel or warbonnet in it. Lots of rock fish too. A couple of lings. As Chris mentioned in his review, last week we had Harbor seals swimming right up to us and playing with us. Very cool dive site.

Chris3/11/2007Rating: 5
We had a great time watching the harbor seals feed and swim around us. Rob had one come nose to nose with him. -Chris



 

 Dive Shops

Underwater Sports

 New Sites

Battleship Island west side
Point Whitney
Newport Fingers
Salmon Falls
The Murph

 Submit a Site!


 NewReviews

Battleship Island west side
Redondo
Deception Pass
Hudson Point
Shilshole Bay Vertical Barge
KVI Tower
Alki , Cove 2
Alki Junkyard
Alki Pipeline
North Jetty

    © The Perfect Dive, All Rights Reserved

Terms |  Site Map